The global competitiveness report 2010 2011

Thus, the impact of each pillar on competitiveness varies across countries, in function of their stages of economic development. It is one of the leading monitors of the competitive condition of economies worldwide.

As wages rise with advancing development, countries move into the efficiency-driven stage of development, when they must begin to develop more efficient production processes and increase product quality. At this point, competitiveness becomes increasingly driven by higher education and training pillar 5efficient goods markets pillar 6efficient labor markets pillar 7developed financial markets pillar 8the ability to harness the benefits of existing technologies pillar 9and its market size, both domestic and international pillar Intermediate values are used for economies in transition between stages.

Companies compete on the basis of prices and sell basic products or commoditieswith their low productivity reflected in low wages. Finally, as countries move into the The global competitiveness report 2010 2011 stage, they are only able to sustain higher wages and a higher standard of living if their businesses are able to compete by providing new or unique products.

As wages rise with advancing development, countries move into the efficiency-driven stage of development, when they must begin to develop more efficient production processes and increase product quality.

Global Competitiveness Report

To maintain competitiveness at this stage of development, competitiveness hinges mainly on well-functioning public and private institutions pillar 1appropriate infrastructure pillar 2a stable macroeconomic framework pillar 3and good health and primary education pillar 4.

Germany maintains a strong position within the Eurozone, although it goes down one position to sixth place, while the Netherlands 7th improves by one position in the rankings, France drops three places to 18th, and Greece continues its downward trend to 90th.

Ability to harness existing technology Market size—both domestic and international Production of new and different goods using the most sophisticated production processes Innovation In the factor-driven stage countries compete based on their factor endowments, primarily unskilled labor and natural resources.

Companies compete on the basis of prices and sell basic products or commoditieswith their low productivity reflected in low wages. To maintain competitiveness at this stage of development, competitiveness hinges mainly on well-functioning public and private institutions pillar 1appropriate infrastructure pillar 2a stable macroeconomic framework pillar 3and good health and primary education pillar 4.

By highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of an economy, policymakers and business leaders are offered an important tool to assist them in the formulation of improved economic policies and institutional reforms. The global economy is expected to grow by some 4. Thus, the impact of each pillar on competitiveness varies across countries, in function of their stages of economic development.

Finally, as countries move into the innovation-driven stage, they are only able to sustain higher wages and a higher standard of living if their businesses are able to compete by providing new or unique products.

At this stage, companies must compete by producing new and different goods using the most sophisticated production processes pillar 11 and through innovation pillar At this point, competitiveness becomes increasingly driven by higher education and training pillar 5efficient goods markets pillar 6efficient labor markets pillar 7developed financial markets pillar 8the ability to harness the benefits of existing technologies pillar 9and its market size, both domestic and international pillar At this point, competitiveness becomes increasingly driven by higher education and training pillar 5efficient goods markets pillar 6efficient labor markets pillar 7developed financial markets pillar 8the ability to harness the benefits of existing technologies pillar 9and its market size, both domestic and international pillar Therefore, in the calculation of the GCI, pillars are given different weights depending on the per capita income of the nation.

Produced in collaboration with leading academics and a global network of Partner InstitutesThe Global Competitiveness Report has expanded its geographic coverage over the years and now assesses economies.

Northern and Western European countries dominate the top 10 with Sweden 3rdFinland 4thGermany 6ththe Netherlands 7thDenmark 8th and the United Kingdom 10th."Table 4: The Global Competitiveness Index – rankings and – comparisons" (PDF). Retrieved ^ World Economic Forum. "Table 4: The Global Competitiveness Index – rankings and – comparisons" (PDF).

Retrieved ^. The Global Competitiveness Report assesses the competitiveness landscape of economies, providing insight into the drivers of their productivity and prosperity. The Report series remains the most comprehensive assessment of national competitiveness worldwide.

The Global Competitiveness Report (GCR) is a yearly report published by the World Economic Forum. Since– rankings.

Global Competitiveness Report 2011 - 2012

Feb 25,  · The Global Competitiveness Report "Table 4: The Global Competitiveness Index – rankings and – comparisons" (PDF). Retrieved We use cookies to improve your experience on our website.

By using our website you consent to all cookies in accordance with our updated Cookie Notice. The Global Competitiveness Report - World Economic Forum - Geneva Switzerland Switzerland tops the overall rankings in The Global Competitiveness Report Singapore overtakes Sweden for second position.

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The global competitiveness report 2010 2011
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